What color do you get when your yarn colors mix? That can seem confusing, but this post explains how color mixing works, both in theory and in practice.

This post also explains how to avoid muddy colors by selecting your colors carefully, following the Two-Primary Rule.

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Because the eye blends small patches of color together, the scale of the pattern as you see it in the finished cloth makes a big difference to color mixing in handwoven fabric. This article explains the effects of scale on color mixing. It’s part of a three-part series explaining the fundamental principles behind color mixing in handweaving.

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Ever had colors that were bright on the cone mix into mud when woven? That’s happened to pretty much all of us. Fortunately, it’s not inevitable. Learn three ways to avoid muddy colors in this post.

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The Warp & Weave weaving color mixing tool allows you to simulate the cloth that results from mixing two colors in warp and weft. You can pick colors manually or from an uploaded image – or simply snap a photo with your smartphone or tablet! – and instantly see how the colors will weave up in four common weave structures (plain weave, 1/3, 2/2, and 3/1 twill). You can see the results in fine, medium, or thick threads.

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Weaving is like painting in some ways. Your warp and weft colors are like tubes of paint, giving you basic colors to start with. Your draft is like your palette and brush, where you take your original paint colors, mix them into new colors, and then place them in your fabric.

Often, when we think about color in weaving, we think only about the colors of the yarns we choose. But this is like thinking only about the colors in your paint tubes. We also need to think about how the drafts will mix the colors.

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